Did you know hydrangeas are native to eastern Asia? In Japan, they are grown in the mountaintops and typically these species have smaller leaves and flowers. There are about 23 known species of hydrangeas, and only five of those are cultivated in the U.S.

Types of Hydrangeas

Mophead: globe-shaped flower clusters
Panicle: long, cone-shaped flower clusters
Lacecap: flattened cluster of tiny buds surrounded by tiny petals at the edges

Assorted Color Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas

How Colors are Produced

The variation of interesting colors in hydrangeas has plenty to do with horticultural science. The plants absorb aluminum which is released from the soil, and as a result, it produces complexes in the flower giving it their color.

Acidic soils produce blue flowers, while soils with high alkalinity levels result in pink and purple colored hydrangeas. Naturally colored petals such as pale cream are produced in soils that have neutral alkaline levels.¬†The greek word for hydrangea is ‘hydroangos’. ‘Hydro’¬†means water, and ‘Angos’¬†means a vessel or jar, which put together refers to the plant’s need for healthy amounts of water.

Caring for Cut Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas are widely used in the floral design industry. The lush extravagance of this lush flower makes it highly popular for weddings and special events. They are excellent for filling space in bouquets and floral displays such as cascading arches and table runners.

Tips To Lengthen Vase Life:

Cut the stems at an angle under water. This prevents bubbles from blocking the intake of water.
Gently puncture holes in the stem with a needle.
Place the hydrangeas in ice-cold water.
Add flower food (or 1 tbsp. of sugar & 1 tsp. bleach)
Mist the flowers with more water.